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Cool Material
 - 09/18/2018

As of June 4, 2018, Voyager 1 is the most distant man-made object from Earth, being over 13.2 billion miles from the sun, and traveling at a rate of 10 miles per second.  The Farthest tells the complete story of the Voyager mission. More than that, it’s a beautiful and inspiring documentary about man’s fascination with space travel, and the wonderment of what we know awaits us in the cosmos.

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Blue Ridge Outdoors
 - 09/17/2018

The top honor of the festival, the Green Fire Award, is granted to The Serengeti Rules by filmmaker Nicholas Brown. This beautifully shot and poignant film shares the story of a band of young scientists and their time in the most remote and spectacular places on Earth. Driven by their insatiable curiosity about how nature works, they discover a single set of “rules” that govern all life.

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The New York Times
 - 08/30/2018

"Inventing Tomorrow” takes a personal look at some scientists — not of the accredited adult variety but teenagers, international students working on projects to make things better. They are “the people who can fix it, and who are going to fix it,” one of them says at the film’s opening.

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Highlandlakes.com
 - 07/3/2018

JOHNSON CITY — It’s not uncommon to see a white-tailed deer herd or a doe with her fawns crossing from one side of the road to the other. For some kids, that’s as close as they get to Mother Nature, which is a travesty to Maggie Goodman, librarian at the Johnson City Library .“All they do is sit with whatever kind of game they play,” she said. “It’s sensory deprivation. I think this is an important mission, to make sure kids learn how inspiring nature is.”Goodman is taking action with “Backyard Wilderness,” the library’s latest exhibit. It opens for a two-month-long stay at 10 a.m.

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Variety
 - 06/13/2018

The festival will close with another double bill: “Serengeti Rules” and “She Is the Ocean.” “ ‘Serengeti’ is one of the most beautiful, visually stunning documentaries I’ve ever seen,” says Rivers. “They shot in the Serengeti but also in the Aleutian Islands, the Pacific Northwest and Peru, and it’s all about our need to preserve the balance of life on Earth. It’s an extremely hopeful film. ‘She Is the Ocean’ is a wonderful documentary about nine women and their relationship to the ocean, and the second part of a trilogy from director Innesse Biohina.”

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Film Score Monthly
 - 05/25/2018

A heartening work on climate change came in Nicolas Brown’s The Serengeti Rules. Five largely unknown heroes of modern ecology headed into international wildernesses decades ago, driven by curiosity about how nature functions.

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NSTA News
 - 04/25/2018

In March, I had the opportunity to attend an early screening of a new IMAX documentary, Backyard Wilderness, that is screening in science centers and other specialty IMAX theaters nationally. The film's central message encourages kids and adults to explore the natural world all around them just outside their door—and disconnect from electronic devices that keep them inside. When I had the opportunity to speak with her after a screening, Susan Todd, the writer, director, and a producer of the film, affirmed her goal for the film was to support outdoor exploration by every child.

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Screen Daily
 - 04/21/2018

A celebration of scientific excellence and an account of a discovery which has ramifications for natural environments the world over, The Serengeti Rules makes for compelling viewing. Based on an acclaimed book by Sean B. Carroll, who appears sporadically in the film as a narrator in one of the film’s less elegant devices, the picture draws together the work of five ecologists and naturalists, working in far-flung locations around the globe.

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New York Times
 - 04/8/2018

The club of scholars named Neil who are good writers and also telegenic is fairly small, with Neil deGrasse Tyson (see “Cosmos: A Spacetime Odyssey”) sometimes seeming to be its only member. But let’s not overlook Neil Shubin, a paleontologist who makes an appealing guide to our evolutionary history on “Your Inner Fish,” a three-part exploration, based on his books, that begins on Wednesday on PBS.

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Tree Hugger
 - 03/26/2018

Many nature films feature exotic creatures in faraway lands -- bat caves in the Yucatan, penguins in Antarctica, lions in the Serengeti. But what about the nature that surrounds us on a daily basis? It is just as wondrous and fascinating, if only we'd take the time to notice what's going on.

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Sierra Magazine
 - 03/21/2018

A field mouse scurries across the kitchen floor. Birds perch on tree branches just outside the house. Raccoons amble by the driveway, and frogs creep across the windows. The film Backyard Wilderness reminds us that wild animals are often close by—feeding, mating, hunting, taking care of their young—and sometimes in plain view, if we humans just take the time to notice.

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ctpost
 - 03/12/2018

There are so many once-in-a-lifetime moments in the new IMAX film, “Backyard Wilderness,” it’s impossible to say which is most powerful. (Like which of your kids do you love the most?!) It might be the scene where a wood duck hatches in its nest, 70 feet up in the cavity of a tree. Or when it leaps down (to the sound of Tom Petty’s “Free Fallin’”), landing on the leafy forest floor before following its mother to a pond.

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Times Free Press
 - 03/11/2018

A new IMAX movie launching at the Tennessee Aquarium on Friday will highlight wildlife commonly found in the eastern United States. The film, titled "The Wild Around You 3D," tells the story of a fictional girl who is screen-obsessed. The girl is challenged by a school assignment to look near her home for wildlife. The assignment changes the course of her life and shows viewers the scope of nature that can be found in many people's backyards.

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Common Sense Media
 - 03/1/2018

Parents need to know that Backyard Wilderness is a nature documentary that dramatizes how meaningful it can be to step away from screens and into the wilderness right outside -- or near -- our homes, particularly for children and teens. Although there's a brief fictional framing story, this is fundamentally a wildlife documentary, with lots of time-lapse footage to educate younger viewers about seasons' impact on animal life cycles and habitats.

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The Atlantic
 - 02/5/2018

It’s not the paradise that germophobes might imagine.

You can see the consequences of this dystopian fan fiction in the video below—the seventh in a series of online films produced by HHMI Tangled Bank Studios, which adapt the stories in my book, I Contain Multitudes.

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Nerdist
 - 01/28/2018

The word you’re going to see most associated with this film is “inspiring,” and while it’s definitely that in a jump-out-of-your-seat kind of way, the overwhelming sense it instilled in me was one of relief. It felt like this is the cavalry that’s come to save us from ourselves. These extraordinary, driven, eco-compassionate children are cancelling the apocalypse.

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Sun Sentinel
 - 11/20/2017

With nearly 50 million people suffering from Alzheimer's disease worldwide, it is more important than ever that we find new treatments and hopefully a cure for this devastating illness. With that goal in mind, nearly 2,000 clinical trials related to Alzheimer's disease have been registered on clinicaltrials.gov, yet there are only five FDA-approved drugs available to patients, and none can halt or reverse the disease.

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Forbes Magazine
 - 10/17/2017

This month, PBS is airing a documentary called The Gene Doctors that spotlights several emerging gene therapies, including Spark Therapeutics’ Luxturna, a treatment for a rare form of blindness that won a unanimous thumbs-up last week from an advisory panel to the FDA. In addition to tracing the history of Spark’s treatment, the film brings attention to gene therapies for cystic fibrosis, Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) and an ultra-rare neurologic disease called fatal familial insomnia.

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Variety
 - 08/11/2017

It’s rare for a film to make one swell with pride about something he or she had no direct hand in, but “The Farthest” accomplishes that feat with aplomb. That said, it’s not exactly surprising that Emer Reynolds’ documentary pulls off such an exceptional deed, given that its subject is one of mankind’s greatest achievements: Voyager 1 and 2, the spacecraft that NASA launched in 1977 on a “grand tour” of our solar system’s remote planets, and the vast stretches of interstellar space that lay beyond.

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The Hollywood Reporter
 - 08/9/2017

You don’t have to be a science geek to love Emer Reynolds’ fascinating documentary about NASA’s landmark Voyager mission that launched two unmanned spacecraft to explore the outer reaches of the solar system. Being given a limited theatrical release in conjunction with the 40th anniversary of the 1977 launch, The Farthest should garner greater appreciative audiences when it airs later this month on PBS.

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Education Week
 - 04/20/2017

A leaf that can fly. Bird droppings that walk. A bright flower that becomes a spider. These were just a few of the onscreen marvels at the Washington premiere of the IMAX movie "Amazon Adventure" this week. And for many of the middle and high school science teachers in the audience, the film provoked planning for a school field trip to the theater.

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USAID
 - 02/20/2017

JOHANNESBURG – February 20, 2017 – From the producers of the widely-acclaimed movie “Inside Story” comes a new feature-length film, THE LUCKY SPECIALS, following a guitarist and his friends on their journey to create a new musical sound and catapult their small-time band to the big stage. The Lucky Specials are a cover band in a dusty town in southern Africa. Mandla [Oros Mampofu (Skeem Saam)] is a miner by day and plays lead guitar for The Lucky Specials by night. He dreams of making it big in the music industry.

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Business Insider
 - 01/5/2015

Extinction is a scary word and a scary topic — but it's one that needs talking about. Why? Because it seems to be happening now. Scientists believe Earth is on the verge of its sixth mass extinction, an event that could devastate ecosystems all over the globe. 

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Variety
 - 11/28/2014

Cramming a lot of science into an hour, the project makes good use of computer animation and other graphics to illustrate the K/T Extinction, the asteroid strike that killed off the dinosaurs 66 million years ago; and the Great Dying, which claimed even more species 250 million years ago. Scientist Sean B. Carroll serves as a guide through the research, enlisting various colleagues in what essentially plays like a jigsaw puzzle, involving theory pieced together from the fossil and geologic record.

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College of Physicians of Philadelphia
 - 09/10/2014

We here at The College of Physicians of Philadelphia were lucky enough to host award-winning filmmaker Sonya Pemberton (who wrote/produced/directed the film)--and her crew in 2012, when they were filming segments of the documentary. A version aired in 2013 as a 90-minute film titled "Jabbed: Love, Fear, and Vaccines."  Pemberton interviewed infectious diseases physician, vaccine developer, and College Fellow Paul A. Offit, MD, in our museum, and used images and artifacts from this website, our library, and the Mütter Museum collection.

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Chicago Tribune
 - 04/9/2014

Moving downward from the shoulder, the arms of Neil Shubin, fish paleontologist, are built like this: one bone, two bones, lots of bones, digits. The same is true for a bird's wing, a leopard's forward leg and the front fins of Tiktaalik, the ancient fish Shubin discovered in arctic Canada that was one of the first to walk on land. 

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L.A. Times
 - 04/9/2014

Ever since Charles Darwin made his way to the Galapagos, we've heard a lot about that fateful moment when some previously water-bound creature pulled itself up from the slowly receding seas, took a breath and began the eons-long march to humanity.

What we didn't know was what that creature looked like and how, specifically, it relates to us.

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Realscreen
 - 04/9/2014

PBS is bolstering its efforts to woo fans of natural history and science by adding an extra hour to its Wednesday night programming block.

Tonight (April 9), the U.S. pubcaster will premiere the three-part series Your Inner Fish, featuring paleobiologist and author Neil Shubin (pictured above). Produced by Tangled Bank Studios and Windfall Films, the miniseries is based on Shubin’s book of the same name and examines the ways human DNA is similar to shrew-like mammals that existed 165 million years ago.

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Los Angeles Times
 - 04/9/2014

Ever since Charles Darwin made his way to the Galapagos, we've heard a lot about that fateful moment when some previously water-bound creature pulled itself up from the slowly receding seas, took a breath and began the eons-long march to humanity. What we didn't know was what that creature looked like and how, specifically, it relates to us. Based on the bestselling book of the same name, "Your Inner Fish" is a six-hour, three-part documentary determined to do just that.

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New York Times
 - 04/8/2014

The club of scholars named Neil who are good writers and also telegenic is fairly small, with Neil deGrasse Tyson (see “Cosmos: A Spacetime Odyssey”) sometimes seeming to be its only member. But let’s not overlook Neil Shubin, a paleontologist who makes an appealing guide to our evolutionary history on “Your Inner Fish,” a three-part exploration, based on his books, that begins on Wednesday on PBS.

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The New York Times
 - 04/7/2014

Neil H. Shubin's long resume - paleontologist, molecular biologist, dean and professor of anatomy at the University of Chicago - can now be added "television host." Dr. Shubin, 53, who helped discover the 375-million-year-old fish called Tiktaalik, hailed as a missing link between sea and land animals, will preside over "Your Inner Fish," a three-part series on evolution (based on his book of the same title) that makes its debut Wednesday on PBS. 

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The New York Times
 - 04/4/2014

When the paleobiologist Neil Shubin looks at his fellow humans, he sees ghosts of animals past. The wy we grip with our hands? We can thank our primate forefathers. Our ability to hear so many sounds? Distant ancestors the size of a shrew.  

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Real Screen
 - 03/28/2014

In his book of the same name, author and paleontologist Neil Shubin posits that the human body as we know it today is the result of 3.5 million years of evolution, and that many of our characteristics can be traced to some rather surprising origins. Now, in a three-part series for PBS, Shubin brings his theories to life. 

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Scientific American
 - 03/27/2014

Two weeks from today, on April 9th, PBS will air the first of a three-part series adapted from Neil Shubin’s popular book, Your Inner Fish: A Journey into the 3.5-Billion-Year-History of the Human Body. If you’ve ever wondered why we’re built the way we are – with five fingers on each hand, testes that hang outside our bodies, and backs and knees that leave us vulnerable to slipped discs and torn ligaments – this series will take you on a journey of discovery you won’t soon forget.

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National Geographic News
 - 03/21/2014

Icons of evolution don't come much uglier than Tiktaalik, the land-walking ancient fish from 375 million years ago.

But Tiktaalik was acclaimed as a beautiful scientific discovery when it was announced in 2006 by paleontologist Neil Shubin and his team. The project was partially supported by the National Geographic Society.

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Real Screen
 - 04/7/2013

Michael Rosenfeld, head of television and film for science specialist prodco Tangled Bank Studios, revealed more about the company’s aims during his keynote session at MIPDoc yesterday (April 6).

Tangled Bank Studios launched out of the philanthropical research organization The Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI) last November with the aim to produce science content for TV, digital, theatrical, and giant screen. Rosenfeld says the prodco’s content will fill what he regards as a gap in science programming in the U.S. 

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MIPblog
 - 04/6/2013

The best science television is far from dry and worthy. Science documentary maker Michael Rosenfeld, now head of television and film at Tangled Bank Studios, gave some insights into his company’s work in a MIPDoc keynote today, while also explaining how the studio is keen to support other producers with similar ambitions.

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C21 Media
 - 10/26/2012

The Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI) has launched a new film and TV production company, with a slate of science and documentary projects lined up for US pubcaster PBS. 

Maryland-based Tangled Bank Studios and its production slate are the first fruits of HHMI’s US$60m investment in content production announced last year, when former National Geographic Television president Michael Rosenfeld was hired to lead the new unit as head of television and film.

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Variety
 - 10/26/2012

The Howard Hughes Medical Institute has launched Tangled Bank Studios as a film-TV production company specializing in science documentaries.

Veteran producer Michael Rosenfeld, who joined the institute last year to head its $60 million documentary initiative, is leading Tangled Bank and told Variety that production is under way on a pair of three-hour TV series that will likely air in 2014 on PBS.

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Real Screen
 - 10/26/2012

Philanthropic research organization the Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI) has launched Tangled Bank Studios, a production company focused on producing science documentary programs. 

Headed by former National Geographic Television (NGT) president Michael Rosenfeld, the editorially independent company is the cornerstone of the Chevy Chase, Maryland-headquartered non-profit’s US $60 million film and television initiative, and will produce around 10 hours of science programming annually for TV, cinemas and digital media. 

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